Archive

        Displaying 3,234 digitized works
    
  1. 201

    An attempt to simplify English grammar :with observations on the method of teaching it

  2. 202

    Aureate terms;a study in the literary diction of the fifteenth century,

  3. 203

    Bad English exposed: a series of criticisms on the errors and inconsistencies of Lindley Murray and other grammarians,

  4. 204

    The basic law of vocal utterance,

  5. 205

    Bathyllus redivivusAn essay proving that the grammar, call'd Sheridan's, is a transcript from the Royal-Grammar: and, that his additions are erroneous, impertinent, and insufficient. By John Greer, A.M. and student in physick.

  6. 206

    Beadle's dime patriotic speaker :being extracts from the splendid oratory of Judge Holt ... together with poems for the hour.

  7. 207

    Beauties of eminent writersselected and arranged for the instruction of youth in the proper reading and reciting of the English language: calculated also to instil into the mind the principles of wisdom and, virtue, and to give it an early taste for the acquisition of useful knowledge, to which is now added, a concise system of English grammar, with exercises in orthography. In two volumes. Sold separately or together. For the use of schools and private classes. Second edition. By William Scott, teacher of the English language and geography in Edinburgh.

  8. 208

    Beecher's recitations and readings :humorous, serious, dramatic, including prose and poetical selections in Dutch, French, Yankee, Irish, Backwoods, Negro, and other dialects

  9. 209

    Bell's standard elocutionist :principles and exercises, (chiefly from "Elocutionary manual") : followed by a copius selection of extracts in prose and poetry, classified and adapted for reading and recitation

  10. 210

    Bellum grammaticaleor, the grammatical battel royal. In reflections on the three English grammars, publish'd in about a year last past. In a letter to the learned and ingenious whilom assistant to the learned Mr. Benjamin Morland of Hackney. With a postscript to Heterologus, usher to the learned Dr. Busby.

  11. 211

    Berry's spelling book,

  12. 212

    Better English for speaking and writing :a series of three books

  13. 213

    Blessing Esau;experiments in high school English-teaching,

  14. 214

    A book of exposition,

  15. 215

    The book of oratory:compiled for the use of colleges, academies, and the higher classes of select and parish schools,

  16. 216

    The Breeches Bible :considered as the basis for remarks, critical and philological, on the English language

  17. 217

    The bride;a play, in five acts.

  18. 218

    A brief English grammar on a logical method

  19. 219

    A brief English grammar,

  20. 220

    A brief English grammar,

  21. 221

    A brief grammar of the English language,explained in twenty lessons.

  22. 222

    A brief outline of elocution,combined with a few choice dramatic and other selections, taken from the best authors.

  23. 223

    A briefer practical rhetoric,

  24. 224

    A briefer practical rhetoric,

  25. 225

    British educationor, the source of the disorders of Great Britain. Being an essay towards proving, that the immorality, ignorance, and false taste, which so generally prevail, are the natural and necessary consequences of the present defective system of education. By Thomas Sheridan, A.M.

  26. 226

    British educationor, the source of the disorders of Great Britain. Being an essay towards proving, that the immorality, ignorance, and false taste, which so generally prevail, are the natural and necessary consequences of the present defective system of education. With a attempt to shew, that a revival of the art of speaking, and the study of our own language, might contribute, in great measure, to the cure of those evils. In three parts. I. Of the use of these studies to religion, and morality; as also, to the support of the British constitution. II. Their absolute necessity in order to refine, ascertain, and fix the English language. III. Their use in the cultivation of the imitative arts: shewing, that were the study of oratory made a necessary branch of the education of youth; poetry, musick, painting, and sculpture, might arrive at as high a pitch of perfection in England, as ever they did in Athens or Rome. By Thomas Sheridan, A.M.

  27. 227

    British educationor, the source of the disorders of Great Britain. Being an essay towards proving, that the immorality, ignorance, and false taste, which so generally prevail, are the natural and necessary consequences of the present defective system of education. With An Attempt to shew, that a Revival of the Art of Speaking, and the Study of our own Language, might contribute, in a great measure, to the Cure of those Evils. In three parts. I. Of the Use of these Studies to Religion, and Morality; as also, to the Support of the British Constitution. II. Their absolute Necessity in order to refine, ascertain, and fix the English Language. III. Their Use in the Cultivation of the Imitative Arts: shewing, that were the Study of Oratory made a necessary Branch of the Education of Youth, Poetry, Music, Painting, and Sculpture, might arrive at as high a Pitch of Perfection in England, as ever they did in Athens or Rome. By Thomas Sheridan, A. M.

  28. 228

    British educationor, the source of the disorders of Great Britain. Being An Essay towards proving, that the Immorality, Ignorance, and false Taste, which so generally prevail, are the natural and necessary Consequences of the present defective System of Education. With an attempt to shew, that a revival of the art of speaking, and the study of our own language, might contribute, in a great measure, to the cure of those evils. In three parts. I. Of the Use of these Studies to Religion, and Morality; as also, to the Support of the British Constitution. II. Their absolute Necessity in order to refine, ascertain, and fix the English Language. III. Their Use in the Cultivation of the Imitative Arts: shewing, that were the Study of Oratory made a necessary Branch of the Education of Youth, Poetry, Music, Painting, and Sculpture, might arrive at as high a Pitch of Perfection in England, on ever they did in Athens or Rome. By Thomas Sheridan, A. M.

  29. 229

    The British grammaror, an essay, in four parts, towards speaking and writing the English language grammatically, and inditing elegantly, for the use of schools, and of private young gentlemen and ladies. [Three lines in Latin from Cicero].

  30. 230

    The British grammaror, an essay, in four parts, towards speaking and writing the English language grammatically, and inditing elegantly. For the use of the schools of Great Britain and Ireland, and of private young gentlemen and ladies.

  31. 231

    The British grammaror, an essay, in four parts, towards speaking and writing the English language grammatically, and inditing elegantly. For the use of the schools of Great Britain and Ireland, and of private young gentlemen and ladies.

  32. 232

    Brown's first lessons in language and grammar

  33. 233

    Brown's grammar improved.The institutes of English grammar, methodically arranged; with forms of parsing and correcting, examples for parsing, questions for examination, false syntax for correction, exercises for writing, observations for the advanced student, five methods of analysis, and a key to the oral exercises: to which are added four appendixes. Designed for the use of schools, academies, and private learners.

  34. 234

    Brown's Small grammar improved :the first lines of English grammar; being a brief abstract of the author's larger work, the "Institutes of English grammar." Designed for young learners

  35. 235

    Brown's Small grammar improved.The first lines of English grammar; being a brief abstract of the author's larger work, the "Institutes of English grammar." Designed for young learners.

  36. 236

    The business man's English

  37. 237

    The business man's English,spoken and written,

  38. 238

    The California text-book :containing a grammar of the Spanish language in English ; of the English in Spanish conversational dialogues in both languages, and a full description of California

  39. 239

    The Canadian elocutionist :designed for the use of colleges, schools and for self instruction, together with a copious selection, in prose and poetry, of pieces adapted for reading, recitation and practice

  40. 240

    The canterbury talesof Chaucer. To which are added an essay on his language and versification, and an introductory discourse: together with notes and a glossary. By the late Thomas Tyrwhitt, Esq. F.R.S.

  41. 241

    The canterbury talesof Chaucer. To which are added, an essay upon his language and versification; an introductory discourse; and notes. In four volumes.

  42. 242

    The century handbook of writing

  43. 243

    The Century handbook of writing,

  44. 244

    Changes in the English language,between the publication of Wiclif's Bible and that of the authorised version. A.D. 1400 to A.D. 1600.

  45. 245

    Charles Butler's English grammar (1634)

  46. 246

    The child and his spelling;an investigation of the psychology of spelling, individual and sex differences in spelling abilities and needs, the character and range of the spelling vocabulary, and the practical problems of teaching spelling,

  47. 247

    The child life fifth reader

  48. 248

    The child vision :being a study in mental development & expression

  49. 249

    The child's friend :being an entirely new, and systematic arrangement of all the sounds, combinations of characters, and exceptions in the English language ...

  50. 250

    The child's grammar :corresponding with parsing lessons and forming part of a series for teaching

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