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        Displaying 3,234 digitized works
    
  1. 151

    Argumentation and debate,

  2. 152

    Aristarchus,or the principles of composition. Containing a methodical arrangement of the grammatical improprieties of common discourse, with select rules for attaining to ease and elegance in conversation, &c. &c.

  3. 153

    Aristarchus,or the principles of composition. Containing a methodical arrangement of the improprieties frequent in writing and conversation, with select rules for attaining to purity and elegance of expression.

  4. 154

    Aristarchus: or a compendious and rational institution of the Latin tongue; with a critical dissertation on the Roman classics, in a chronological order. Now revised a second time, and much improv'd, by Thomas Bowles, D.D. Vicar of Brackley in Northamptonshire, and late Fellow of Magdalene-College, in Oxford

  5. 155

    The art of breathing as the basis of tone-production("the old Italian school of singing") indisensable to singers, elocutionists, educators ... and to all others desirous of having a pleasant voice and good health,

  6. 156

    The art of breathing as the basis of tone-production("the old Italian school of singing") indisensable to singers, elocutionists, educators ... and to all others desirous of having a pleasant voice and good health,

  7. 157

    The art of delivering written language.

  8. 158

    The art of discourse :a system of rhetoric adapted for use in colleges and academies, and also for private study

  9. 159

    The art of discourse :a system of rhetoric adapted for use in colleges and academies, and also for private study

  10. 160

    The art of discourse:a system of rhetoric adapted for use in colleges and academies,

  11. 161

    The art of discourse:a system of rhetoric,

  12. 162

    The art of discourse:a system of rhetoric, adapted for use in colleges and academies, and also for private study.

  13. 163

    The art of elocution :from the simple articulation of the elemental sounds of language, up to the highest tone of expression in speech attainable by the human voice.

  14. 164

    The art of elocution as an essential part of rhetoric :with instructions in gesture and an appendix of oratorical, poetical, and dramatic extracts

  15. 165

    The art of elocution as an essential part of rhetoric :with instructions in gesture and an appendix of oratorical, poetical, and dramatic extracts

  16. 166

    The art of elocution, or, Logical and musical reading and declamation :with an appendix, containing a copious practice in oratorical, poetical, and dramatic reading and recitation, the whole forming a complete speaker, well adapted to private pupils, classes, and the use of schools

  17. 167

    The art of elocution;or, logical and musical reading and declamation. With an appendix containing a copious practice in oratorical, poetical, and dramatic reading and recitation; the whole forming a complete speaker, well adapted to private pupils, classes, and the use of schools.

  18. 168

    The art of memory;being a comprehensive and practical system of memory culture,

  19. 169

    The art of oratorical composition :based upon the precepts and models of the old masters

  20. 170

    The art of oratory, system of Delsarte,

  21. 171

    The art of pronuntiation,digested into two parts: vox audienda & vox videnda ....

  22. 172

    The art of reading :containing a number of useful rules exemplified by a variety of selected and original pieces, narrative, didactic, argumentative, poetical, descriptive, pathetic, humourous, and entertaining, together with dialogues, speeches, orations, addresses, and harangues : calculated to improve the scholar in reading and speaking with propriety and elegance, and to impress the minds of youth with sentiments of virtue and religion : designed for the use of schools and families

  23. 173

    The art of reading aloud in pulpit, lecture room, or private reunions ...

  24. 174

    The art of reading and speaking.

  25. 175

    The art of reading and writing Englishor, the chief principles and rules of pronouncing our mother-tongue, both in Prose and Verse; with a Variety of Instructions for True Spelling. Written at first for Private Use, and now Published for the Benefit of all Person, who desire a better Acquaintance with their Native Language. By I. Watts.

  26. 176

    The art of reading and writing Englishor, the chief principles and rules of pronouncing our mother-tongue, both in Prose and Verse; with a Variety of Instructions for True Spelling. Written at first for Private Use, and now Published for the Benefit of all Persons who desire a better Acquaintance with their Native Language. By I. Watts, D.D.

  27. 177

    The art of reading and writing English: or, The chief principles and rules of pronouncing our mother-tongue, both in prose and verse; with a variety of instructions for true spelling.Written at first for private use, and now published for the benefit of all persons who desire a better acquaintance with their native language. By I. Watts, D.D.

  28. 178

    The art of reading and writing English: or, The chief principles and rules of pronouncing our mother-tongue, both in prose and verse; with a variety of instructions for true spelling.Written at first for private use, and now published for the benefit of all persons who desire a better acquaintance with their native language. By L. Watts, D.D.

  29. 179

    The art of reading, or, Rules for the attainment of a just and correct enunciation of written language :mostly selected from Walker's Elements of elocution, and adapted to the use of schools.

  30. 180

    The art of reading.

  31. 181

    The art of rendering;a condensed and comprehensive treatise on the culture of the three-fold nature and the mental method of reading and speaking,

  32. 182

    The art of rhetoric made easyor, the elements of oratory briefly stated, and fitted for the practice of the studious youth of Great-Britain and Ireland: in two books. The First comprehending the Principles of that excellent Art, conformable to, and supported by the Authority of the most accurate Orators and Rhetoricians, both Ancient and Modern, viz. Isocrates, Aristotle, Cicero, Dionysius Halicarnass. Quintilian, Vossius, Petrus Ramus, Cyp. Soarius, Aud. Talaeus, Dugard, Farnaby, Butler, Smith, Walker, Burton, Blackwall, Lowe, Rollin, A. B. of Cambray, Mess. de Port-Royal, &c. The Whole being distinguished into what is necessary to be repeated, and what may be made only Matter of Observation. The Second containing the Substance of Longinus's celebrated Treatise on the Sublime. In Both which all Technical Terms are fully explained, with their Derivations, and proper Examples applied to demonstrate and illustrate allthe Tropes, Figures, and Fine Turns, that are to be met with, or imitated, either in the Scriptures, Classics, or other polite Writings as well Oratorial as Poetical. The second impression corrected and improved. By John Holmes, Master of the Publick Grammar-School, in Holt, Norfolk.

  33. 183

    The art of rhetoric made easyor, the elements of oratory briefly stated, and fitted for the practice of the studious youth of Great-Britain and Ireland: in two books. The First comprehending the Principles of that excellent Art. conformable to, and supported by the Authority of the most accurate Orators and Rhetoricians, both Ancient and Modern, viz. Isocrates, Aristotle, Cicero, Dionysius Halicarnass. Quintilian, Vossius, Petrus Ramus, Cyp. Soarius, Aud. Talaeus, Dugard, Earnaby, Butler, Smith, Walker, Burton, Blackwall, Lowe, Rollin, A. B. of Cambray, Mess. de Port-Royal, &c. The Whole being distinguished into what is necessary to be repeated, and what may be made only Matter of Observations. The Second containing the Substance of Longinus's celebrated Treatise on the Sublime. In Both which all Technical Terms are fully explained, with their Derivations, and proper Examples applied to demonstrate and illustrate all the Tropes, Figures, and Fine Turns, that are to be met with, of imitated, either in the Scriptures, Classics, or other polite Writings as well Oratorial as Poetical. By John Holmes, Master of the Publick Grammar-School, in Holt, Norfolk.

  34. 184

    The art of rhetoric made easyor, the elements of oratory. Book II. Being the substance of Dionysius Longinus's celebrated treatise of The sublime, ... In several letters to a friend.

  35. 185

    The art of rhetoric made easy:

  36. 186

    The art of rhetoric made easy: or, The elements of oratory briefly stated, and fitted for the practice of the studious youth of Great Britain and Ireland: in two books. The first comprehending the principles of that excellent art, conformable to, and supported by the authority of the most accurate orators and rhetoricians, both ancient and modern ... The second containing the substance of Longinus's celebrated treatise On the sublime. In both which all technical terms are fully explained.

  37. 187

    The art of rhetoric made easy: or, The elements of oratory briefly stated, and fitted for the practice of the studious youth of Great-Britain and IrelandIn two books. The first comprehending the principles of that excellent art, conformable to, and supported by the authority of the most accurate orators and rhetoricians, both ancient and modern, viz. Isocrates. Aristotle, Cicero, Dionysius Halicarnass. Quintilian, Vossius, Petrusramus, Cyp. Soarius, Aud. Talŭs, Dugaro, Farwaby, Butlen, Smith, Walker, Burton, Blackwall, Lowe. Rollin, ABp. of Cambray, Miss. De Port-Royal &, the whole being distinguished into what is necessary to be repeated, and what may be made only matter of observation. The second containing the substance of Lon-Ginus's celebrated treatise on the sublime. In both which all technical terms are fully explained, with their derivations, and proper examples applied to demonstrate and illustrate all the tropes, figures, and fine turns, that are to be met with, or imitated, either in the scriptures, classics, or other polite writings as well oratorial as poetical. The third impression, corrected and improved. By John Holmes, late master of the publick grammar-school, in Holt, Norfolk.

  38. 188

    The art of rhetorick laid down in an easy entertaining manner, and illustrated with several beautiful orations from Demosthenes, Cicero, Sallust, Homer, Shakespear, Milton, &c. Being the sixth volume of the Circle of the sciences, &c. By the King's Autharity

  39. 189

    The art of right spelling and pronouncing all the words of the English tongue.Very useful for all persons that are desirous to learn to write properly, and to know how to Spell those Words which are not Writ in the same Manner as they are Pronounced. By which also Foreigners may be Instructed how to Pronounce the most Difficult and Troublesome Words of the English Tongue. To which is added, an exact account of all the stops, marks, and references that commonly occur in authors.

  40. 190

    The art of speaking

  41. 191

    The art of speaking

  42. 192

    The art of speaking in publickor an essay on the action of an orator; as to his pronunciation and gesture. Useful in the senate or theatre, the court, the camp, as well as the bar and pulpit.

  43. 193

    The art of speaking in publik:or, An essay on the action of an orator; as to his pronunciation and gesture. Useful in the senate or theatre, the court, the camp, as well as the bar and pulpit.

  44. 194

    The art of speaking: written in French by Messieurs du Port Royal: in persuance of a former treatise, intituled, The art of thinking. Rendred into English

  45. 195

    The art of speaking; upon an entire new plan. And in which the operations and emotions of the mind are particularly considered. The whole illustrated by a numerous Selection of Examples, Ancient and Modern, In Prose and Verse. Calculated to form the minds of Youth to ajust Sense of Propriety in Mental Delivery, And not unworthy the perusal of the Gentlemen of The Bar, The Pulpit, OR, The Stace

  46. 196

    The art of writing English :a manual for students, with chapters on paraphrasing, essay-writing, précis-writing, punctuation, and other matters

  47. 197

    The arte or crafte of rhethoryke;

  48. 198

    The arts of logick and rhetorick,illustrated by examples taken out of the best authors, Antient and Modern, In all the Polite Languages. Interpreted and explain'd by that Learned and Judicious Critick, Father Bouhours. To which are added, parallel quotations out of the most eminent English authors in Verse and Prose: Wherein the like Observations are made on their Beauties and Blemishes, in all the various Kinds of Thought and Expression.

  49. 199

    The arts of writing, reading, and speaking

  50. 200

    An attempt to simplify English grammar :with observations on the method of teaching it

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